Subtitled bit of Luc de Heusch’s excellent “Sur les traces du renard pâle”, followed with interventions by Jean Rouch and Germaine Dieterlen, as this is actually an excerpt from “Dogons : Chronique d’une passion” (a documentary including bits of other documentaries). As I don’t have a copy of “Sur les traces du renard pâle”, this is the only part of it I have at my disposition.

Once again, the translation and subtitles are home-made, so I beg forgiveness for accuracy/grammar issues.

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Some sort of disclaimer :

Reading the comments (and checking their evaluations), you may notice how the Dogon are popular amongst ufologists and archaeology-fiction afficionadoes. This is mostly a side effect of this fun anecdote about Sirius, blown out of proportion by the prism of “ancient astronauts” romantism (a long tradition which can be traced back to XIXth century theosophy, according to Wiktor Stoczkowski, and which logic still nourishes today’s sci-fi art and ufo cults). It is an interesting cultural phenomenon in itself, but I just wish to stress here how it is, actually, not very respectful of the Dogon culture.

While these ufo-fans may consider flattering to link exotic populations to highly civilized aliens (representing the top of evolution on very same axis that supposedly puts us above “primitives”), they actually do two things. Firstly, they generally assume the contacted cultures wouldn’t have been able to produce themselves the artefacts (nazca lines, pyramids, etc) that aliens are supposed to have built -or taught them how to-. Secondly, instead of actually studying and trying to embrace the complexity of remote mythologies, they over-simplify them and reduce them to familiar elements such as western science-fiction. This kind of reappropriation spares them the trouble and unease of facing a rich system of thought based on its own logic, meaningful yet complicated to grasp (or even “feel”) when arriving from a different culture.

It is actually a basic act of colonialism. Hijacking alterity and bringing it down to fit familiar, comfortable concepts of ours. The same ethnocentrist mistakes have been made for centuries everywhere (reading amerindian societies in terms of western politics, “mana” in term of soul, etc), but here it’s done pretty deliberately.

Let me suggest those people to try and approach Dogon mythology from the Dogon side, instead of the flying saucer one. It’s actually a bit more fair, a bit more respectful, and, because of its abstract poetry and mind-numbing complexity, much more rewarding. And paradoxally, because it actually belongs to a different society, much more “alien” than a star wars spaceship.

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Anthony Aveni, a pioneer in the field of archaeoastronomy, spoke at Vanderbilt University June 15 on “Patterns on the Pampa: Secrets of the Nazca Lines.”

A pioneer in the field of archaeoastronomy, Avenis research focuses on the astronomical history of Latin America, particularly the Aztec and Maya of ancient Mexico. In this lecture, he spoke on the enigmatic ground drawings in Nazca, Peru, that depict monkeys, birds, fish and spiders.

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Aired Friday Sept 17th 2010
http://www.coasttocoastam.com
http://www.enterprisemission.com
I do not have the Article on this, but if i do come across it, i will post it in the Description and on my Next ET Disclosure update.
Update: I found that article

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetec…
Another Article from Phantoms and Monsters

http://www.naturalplane.blogspot.com/…

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